Tag: XingYi

Dai Family Heart Mind Six Unions Martial Arts

As I always emphasize, a traditional Chinese name carries the spirit of its object. To gain an insight into the Dai Family XinYi martial arts system, let’s look more closely into its traditional name: XinYi LiuHe Quan 戴氏心意六合拳 .

Literally, Xin means heart and Yi means mind. As the name XinYi implies, we need to use both our heart and our mind to learn and practice this system – and vice versa – practicing with this martial arts tradition is also a way to cultivate your heart and mind. In both respects, XinYi is not a system that focuses solely on the mastery of physical fighting skills.

Liu means six and He means combine, combination, cooperate, unite, and union. LiuHe means “the Union of Six” and it is a Daoist philosophical phrase used interchangeably with “universe.” The Chinese expression for universe is YuZhou 宇宙 (Yu 宇 means space and Zhou 宙 means time) – the union of space and time. In Daoist philosophy, each individual object or concept consists of three parts. With respect to the universe, Yu contains the Shang  上 (upper), Zhong 中 (middle), and Xia 下 (lower) components of space, and within Zhou, the Gu 古 (ancient or past), Jin 今 (modern or present), and Lai 來 (future or upcoming) create the inseparable aspects of time. The universe itself is the union of these six factors, and the true meaning of LiuHe is the union of the three dimensions of space and the three dimensions of time.

The XinYi LiuHe Quan internal alchemy and martial arts system was intentionally and mindfully created to help the practitioner emulate with universal Way.

Quan 拳 means fist, and is generally used to represent a form or a system of martial arts. However, in the inner teachings of XinYi internal martial arts system, we learn the true meaning of Quan is not Quan 拳, but Quan 圈 , which means circle or circular. In the XinYi system, we always practice with circular movements and use the circle – not the fist – to defeat our opponents. There is not a single movement in the entire system that does not include round patterns. XinYi Quan is a method of internal cultivation that aligns the practitioner with the circular Way of Heaven.

The XinYi LiuHe Quan heart-mind cultivation methods provide a key to the state of Oneness, a palpable feeling of no separation between human being and the Dao, where there is no difference between man and nature. In China, we describe this as YuZhouZaiWuShen WuShenZaiYuZhou 宇宙在吾身 吾身在宇宙 – The universe is within me and I am the universe. To awaken into this high-level martial arts state during combat trainings we must know how to unite the three dimensions of the time and the three dimensions of the space in our body and in all of our movements.

Dai Family XinYi is DanDaoWuShu 丹道武術 – an internal martial arts system entirely based on the principles of Daoist alchemy. This system embodies the richness and depth of Daoist philosophy as well as a method to explore healing, internal alchemy, and spiritual transformation.

The XinYi Martial Arts classic states:

XinYi classicYangLingGen ErDongXinZhe DiJiangYe

GuLingGen ErJingXinZhe XiuDaoYe

Nourished by your spiritual root

Guided by your heart

The enemy is defeated

Unwavering spiritual root

And a tranquil heart Cultivate the Dao

…read the full article, published in Tai Chi Chuan & Oriental Arts here

…buy the book! XinYi WuDao – Heart Mind: The Dao of Martial Arts here

New Release! Dai Family XinYi book

XinYi WuDao – Heart-Mind: The Dao of Martial Arts

In his unprecedented account on the way of martial arts, Master Zhongxian Wu explores WuDao through systematic instruction of select practices from China’s legendary Dai Family Style XinYi Martial Arts School. Traditional Chinese martial arts embody the richness and depth of Daoist philosophy, and their disciplined practice is an effective way to experience healing, internal alchemy and spiritual transformation.

XinYi martial arts, as with all traditional Chinese martial arts, build strength and stamina and involve a process of inner cultivation that can bring practitioners closer to the Dao. Master Wu examines and interprets the connections between Daoist numerology, the spirit of classical Chinese martial arts, and internal alchemy practices. With extensive reference to the classic texts, this book provides unique and considered guidance that will inspire and empower practitioners of all levels.

An authentic insight into the spiritual world of classical Chinese martial arts, this book is essential reading for practitioners of martial arts, NeiDan (internal alchemy), XinYi, Xingyi Quan, Taiji Quan, Bagua Zhuang, Qigong, Chinese medicine, as well as anyone interested in traditional Chinese culture.

Contents: Foreword. Introduction: The Art of Peace. 1. Dao. Daoist Philosophy and DanWu. 2. WuJi HuanYuan. The Essence of Daoist Alchemical Martial Arts. 3. Taiji LianYi. The Secret of Dragon Body. 4. SanCai SiXuang. The Way of Circle and Square. 5. WuXing QuanMu. The Mother Form of XinYi. 6. LiuHe XinYi. Advanced Approach. 7. BaGua XinJing. Achieve Enlightenment. Afterword.

Reviews:

“Dai Family XinYi is a rare martial art in China. It is so hidden that many practitioners have never even seen the practice. In this book, Master Wu reveals many techniques that have never been made available to the public. This is a very valuable book for readers to trace back the origin and hidden treasure of the powerful Xingyi Quan.”

—Master C S Tang, senior Xingyi Quan, Bagua Quan and Yi Quan expert and researcher, and author of The Mysterious Power of Xingyi Quan and The Complete Book of Yiquan

“In this illuminating book on XinYi WuDao, Master Wu guides us step-by-step on a journey into the heart of the ultimate martial art–the art beyond fighting. Whether your interest lies primarily in the practice or the philosophy, you will discover within these pages precious gems of wisdom and power that will enrich your life.”

-Daniel Reid, best-selling author and leading expert on Eastern philosophy and medicine

“Providing an in depth explanation of the links between Daoism and Chinese martial arts, Master Wu shows his deep dedication and unique knowledge of these two ancient traditions. There are many similar links that can be made between aikido and its philosophy, which makes this book a fantastic source of inspiration for all aikido practitioners.”

—Jan Nevelius Shihan (6th Dan Aikikai Tokyo), Chinese medicine practitioner and author